This entry is Part 6 in a series about my trip to Nepal in 2005.

Waiting for Mani Rimdu to begin

Waiting for Mani Rimdu to begin

The sudden flutter of activity at the front door of Tengboche Monastery brought everyone to their feet. Afternoon clouds settled at the crest of the hill, erasing parts of the deep blue sky with dramatic effect. The horns, previously droning from a window of the monastery, transitioned into a full-fledged musical procession moving down the front steps signaling the beginning of the day’s Mani Rimdu festivities.

Mani Rimdu celebrates the establishment of Buddhism in Tibet by Guru Rinpoche. The festival begins on the first day of the tenth month of the Tibetan lunar calendar (around October or November) and brings together the Tibetan, Sherpa and monastic communities of the region. For the first nine days of Mani Rimdu monks conduct private, sacred ceremonies called Drupchen, which are followed on the tenth day by the Wang, a blessing ceremony for the general public by the abbot of the monastery. This is followed by masked dances and celebration over three days with a fire puja marking the end of the festival.

To our delight, we arrived on the day of the Wang. The monks of Tengboche played horns, cymbals and drums as they exited the gate onto the trail in front of the monastery. Their full ceremonial dress included yellow hats symbolic of the Gelug school of Vajrayana Buddhism. Wrapped in a gold robe, one of the monks walked past with a two-foot conch shell held to his lips — what looked to be an antique musical instrument from far, far away.

At the gompa next to the monastery, the procession paused in an exquisite display of color and ceremony punctuated by a fantastic arc of yellow atop each monk’s head. Their music beat on in a clash of cymbals and horns as a masked man stepped into the focus of the growing crowd of Sherpas and trekkers. Snowy Kangtega filled the sky behind him.

Mi-Tsering of Mani Rimdu

Mi-Tsering of Mani Rimdu

Mi-Tsering is a featured persona of Mani Rimdu. He’s also known as Long Life Man. Narrative from Chiwong Monastery in Kathmandu says Mi-Tsering “is a kind, bumbling, gentle old man. He means well and does his best, but inevitably gets everything wrong. He is, however, convinced that he’s an expert and tries to instruct others in some of the temple rituals, such as offering khataks (silk scarves), or doing prostrations. His is a light-hearted comic act, yet it brings a poignant message of encouragement to ordinary people — that sincerity and good intentions count for as much as expertise. It is Mi-Tsering who heads the procession of monks welcoming Trulshig Rinpoche’s arrival at Chiwong, and who heralds him into the courtyard to preside over the dances. He is an acknowledgement of every man’s good intentions, however humble.”

Here in the Himalayas, Mi-Tsering preceded the appearance of Tengboche Rinpoche, Abbot of Tengboche Monastery. I am still astounded at my sheer luck getting a decent photograph of this revered man.

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Tengboche Rinpoche, Abbot of the Tengboche Monastery

Narrative of the Tengboche Monastery notes, “In 1935, on the same day the Dalai Lama was born, a Sherpa family from Namche Bazaar had a son. When this boy was still very small he insisted he had a home and possessions in Tengboche. His family went to visit Ngawang Tenzin Norbu in Rongbuk and this high lama, who had always been closely connected with Tengboche, recognized him as the Tulku or reincarnation of Lama Gulu (founder of Tengboche Monastery, who died in 1934). He was given the name Ngawang Tenzin Zangbu. When the family returned to Namche the monks from Tengboche came with possessions from Lama Gulu mixed in with other monks’ possessions. The boy picked out everything that had belonged to the previous lama without hesitation. Everyone agreed he was the true incarnation and he was brought to Tengboche Monastery. He then undertook many years of hard study and training. He spent many years in Tibet studying with the great masters there. In 1956 he returned to Tengboche as the Abbot of the monastery and is known as Tengboche Rinpoche.”

The Abbot and monks moved to the side of the monastery where they were seated with Sherpas of the community. Mi-Tsering sat in a chair at a corner of the gathering, silk scarf in his hands, fielding curious looks from the Sherpas around him. Mani Rilwu and Tshereel were distributed with tea as Tengboche Rinpoche began giving the empowerment for long life, happiness and prosperity to everyone attending.

Trulshig Rinpoche, Abbot of Chiwong Monastery, says, “Seeing Mani Rimdu is like receiving a blessing.” Indeed, we felt blessed having seen this unique cultural event deep in the Himalayas. We returned to camp and rested up for the next day’s journey farther into the Khumbu.

Next: Regarding Everest — the final post in this series about Nepal.

This entry is Part 6 in a series about my trip to Nepal in 2005. Previous entries can be found here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

9 comments

  1. Beautiful photographs and history. I love that photo of Mi-Tsering of Mani Rimdu, the overall composition with the backdrop is fantastic. And to have gotten that wonderful photograph of Tengboche Rinpoche is indeed exciting.

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  2. What a beautiful account on Mani Rimdu, a religious ceremony I’ve never heard of before. Preserving such a colorful important tradition celebrating the history of a society is essential to mankind, I believe. Modern people learn ancient wisdom through such ceremony, and in return local communities benefit in two aspects: economy and cultural preservation. Great photos!

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    1. Bama! Thank you so much! I agree, preserving these kinds of traditions is essential and each time a traveler experiences them and shares them, they live on in the world and remain preserved at least for a little while longer. Blogging is such a wonderful platform for this, and learning from each other in this way is so rewarding. Thanks for sharing your thoughts! 🙂

      Like

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