Cenote :: Mexico

Cenote :: Mexico

We’ve been here for one month visiting friends, working remotely and relaxing in Tulum, Mexico after leaving Vancouver, Canada. Many have asked what we’re doing and we don’t have an immediate answer to that question. We’ve embarked on a nomadic lifestyle, at least for now. We’ll see how long it lasts based on budget, desire and knocks on the door from my husband’s world of film and visual effects. We came here for tropical heat, cheap tacos and a slower pace of life. We’ve found all of that plus a few adventures, some big surprises and an alluring dose of Mayan history.

We’ve been staying in a great apartment on the edge of town, which also happens to be a 20-minute bike ride from the Tulum ruins. I’ve been to the ruins once before — about 15 years ago — but that was long before history and culture really began to make my heart beat. Being here again, in the context of the Yucatán Peninsula, has been given me a new awareness of the richness and depth of culture in this region. The highlights of spending time here have included watching the Travesia Sagrada, and learning about the vast network of caves and cenotes below the surface of Tulum and its neighboring towns.

The Travesia Sagrada honors a historic journey from centuries ago. Mayans traveled by canoe (departing north of Tulum) to the sacred island of Cozumel and its temple honoring Ixchel, goddess of the moon and fertility. The pilgrimage was important for women hoping to have children and men praying for a good harvest.

Nowadays, about 300 men and women in 30 canoes row to Cozumel and return the following morning. In the process of learning about the Travesia Sagrada through a friend who participated, I’ve also learned about temescals (sweat lodges) and a Spanish bishop named Diego de Landa who single-handedly did more than anyone else to both record and destroy Mayan culture. It was de Landa who documented the travesia in the 1500s, but it was also de Landa who burned essential Mayan manuscripts and images out of his religious intolerance.

As for the caves and cenotes here, they may be Tulum’s most enjoyable secret, although they’re not really a secret. Many people know of them but they aren’t too overcrowded. Yet. Typically, a cenote is a large hole in the ground that leads to a larger hole filled with fresh water draining to the ocean. Most cenotes are very deep (in some, you can’t see the bottom) and often connected to other cenotes by caves and channels.

Cenote Labnaha :: Tulum, Mexico

Cenote Labnaha :: Tulum, Mexico

If you’re an adventure scuba diver, cenotes are a unique paradise. If you’re not comfortable in the water, you will hate cenotes. They can be very dangerous if you’re inexperienced, unprepared or your equipment fails (which Jay was witness to at a cenote/lagoon south of Tulum). We explored Cenote Labnaha with a guide, which was both fascinating and freaky. For one hour we snorkeled through low caves, dodged stalactites, looked down at the scuba ropes leading into even deeper caves, and turned off our flashlights to 15 seconds of complete and terrifying darkness.

Cenotes played a part in Mayan history as a place of worship and sacrificial offerings. The Tulum ruins include a “House of the Cenote” and at Ek Balam there’s a cenote visible from the La Acrópolis. Our next door neighbor, who we call the Jacques Cousteau of the Yucatán, has been exploring and mapping Tulum’s network of caves and cenotes for the past two decades. He’s found artifacts and human remains in several.

Sargasso :: Tulum, Mexico

Sargasso :: Tulum, Mexico

Tulum itself is a gritty little town with upscale construction threatening its charm at every turn in the road. It’s straddling an impossible line between retaining its character and leveraging the considerable foreign interest it holds as a seaside destination not far from Cancún. A bigger, pressing issue may be global warming. The coastline here is showing signs of the battle — not against trash, but against a super-bloom of sargasso macroalgae that is relentlessly dumping ashore in a rotting brown mass (pictured above). No one can keep up with it and hardly anyone is hanging out at the beach as a result. In addition, Mexico’s elections are just a couple weeks away and running for office here can be a life-threatening pursuit. This is a country battling many forces against it, including its neighbor to the north.

Tulum Ruins, Mexico

Tulum Ruins, Mexico

Beneath all of this patina, the history here shines brightly. The region is punctuated by the magnificent temples of Chichen Itza, Ek Balam and Cobá, and countless smaller sites cover the peninsula. It would take weeks — if not months — to see them all. Yet it feels like layers and layers remain to be discovered in the crumbling limestone and tropical vegetation.

The Tulum ruins stand alone as a unique coastal site — the only one in Mayan history — and old port for the city of Cobá. Originally called Zamá (dawn or sunrise), the site of Tulum flourished from 1200-1500 AD, and declined in the 75 years after the Spanish made first contact in the early 1500s.

Between 1,000 and 1,500 people lived at Tulum. Based on the wall with four small doorways protecting the ruins, people living within the site may have been of a higher social class than people living outside the wall.

El Castillo (The Castle) sits at the cliff edge overlooking the ocean. Surely the view is spectacular from it’s highest level although you’re not allowed to climb the steps. Standing alongside the east wall facing the sea, it dominates and feels fortified against the weather with its battered construction. But the articulation of the stone ledges and borders adds delicate beauty. Whoever designed the castle and surrounding structures had an evident appreciation of design and proportion.

The Descending God

The Descending God

The Descending God, a notable deity of the Yucatán peninsula, is portrayed at the Tulum Ruins. This figure holds a characteristic pose — inverted, with feet at the top and face at the bottom looking forward. The Descending God is associated with bees and war, and interesting combination. Honey was a vital export of the region and war was a way of attaining power. You can read more about the Descending God here.

The Temple of the Frescoes holds weathered depictions of deities above the colonnade. Even a bit of color remains from the natural pigments (achiote, chochineal and palygorskite or Maya Blue among them) that once painted the sites of this region but have since washed away. What I find most striking about Mayan art is that it so closely resembles the style of indigenous art throughout western Canada. The depictions of gods and animals in both regions share a highly graphic quality of thick lines, robust shapes and bold expressions. Is it coincidence or relation?

I see you :: Tulum Ruins

I see you :: Tulum Ruins

 

Tulum Ruins :: Mexico

Tulum Ruins :: Mexico

Walking around the rest of the site, all of the structural remains have simple rectangular footprints with finished-floor elevations above ground level. Could the varied floor heights have indicated status even within the social hierarchy of the select people living here? Could this detail have helped keep the bugs and reptiles out — of which there are many! Or the rain? Did the added elevation simply keep the floor dry? It has rained in solid sheets over the past few days so this had to have been a concern at such an exposed site bordering the ocean.

Grand Palace :: Tulum Ruins, Mexico

Grand Palace :: Tulum Ruins, Mexico

There are so many unanswerable questions, lost to the forgetfulness of time. Even I have questions related to my own life that have surfaced while being here. When I was a kid — four or five years old — I had two imaginary friends for a period of time. I have no recollection of how I conjured them up. I only remember their unusual names: Chaka and Cobba (as I spelled them). Since coming here, I’ve learned two interesting names that correlate: Chaahk, the Mayan god of rain and Cobá, the historic Mayan city that once dominated the region.

Have I lived here before? Is it coincidence or memory?

Tulum Ruins, Mexico

Tulum Ruins, Mexico

35 comments

  1. So enjoyable to get a nice, long post about what you’re up to! I could have offered you tropical heat and pretty cheap tacos here in Houston, but I admit your heavy dose of Mayan history and culture, the beaches (even if sargasso-strewn), and creepy cenotes all make Tulum a little bit more engaging! (Coincidentally, my husband just this minute said we are about to get your solid sheets of Yucatan rain starting today …)

    Anyway, what a great adventure you are having for your first foray as nomadic travelers! Tulum sounds like an excellent place to balance economics, weather, light packing requirements, and learning opportunities; having friends there is a huge bonus, too. I know I’ve commented on your cenote swims on Instagram, but it bears repeating that you are very brave to keep immersing yourself in those scary earth-holes. I found them intriguing and eerily beautiful, but one long swim through the tunnels was enough to last me a lifetime!

    Looking forward to seeing where your wandering takes you next and hoping one of those places overlaps with where I am at the moment!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey! SO… cheap tacos and “scary earth holes” (ha ha!) kept us fed and busy for a few weeks and we enjoyed Tulum a lot. We followed that with some time in Colorado and a work trip to Lake Tahoe for me (J is enjoying a few months off as a trailing house husband and man of leisure). On our last day in Tahoe, we heard about a little cabin up for rent just a short walk from the beach. We checked it out and decided it was to good to pass up! So here we are, lakeside for the coming six months (at least). This opportunity eclipsed our plans to be nomads for the rest of the year — something that took us completely by surprise. We still have a trip planned to Paris and Bavaria for a month in Nov/Dec. so we’ll still get to wander a bit. But for now… morning kayaks and evening sunsets (with wine!) are the features of the day. Come visit and hike in Tahoe!! We have plenty of room and the lake is calling!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow – how exciting! I love that your minds are open to all possibilities, and that your jobs allow for that kind of flexibility. I have never been to Lake Tahoe (what?!) and I have heard it is just gorgeous. And a cabin by the lake … I am sighing with vicarious pleasure just imagining it. We’ve got big plans for the next month (including a Colorado wedding for our son!), but I will keep your offer in my head for later, you can be sure!

        Your Paris/Bavaria trip sounds great; I love Europe in the wintertime – so much more relaxed than the summer. Thanks for the update – I’ve been so curious about your direction these days!

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  2. Love this whole post with your captures of a historic Travesia Sagrada and your description of what would absolutely terrify me — cenotes. You’re brave to become a nomad, but also one who is reaping rewards far beyond what most of us get to experience. Looking forward to more posts!

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    1. Thank you! And sorry for the late reply to your comment. Summer is so busy and our nomadic plans have taken a small, unexpected (and welcome) pause in Lake Tahoe! More posts from here soon. Hope you’re enjoying the summer!

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  3. What a wonderful post: I feel like I am getting to know more about this place you are discovering and the nomadic lifestyle you’ve adopted. It sounds like a gift in time you are giving yourselves, for whatever it turns out to be. Enjoy! P.S. Just landed in Vancouver under sunny skies. Beautiful place too!

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    1. Hey! How did you like Vancouver? Your Instagram posts were beautiful! Looked like you were enjoying it and had good weather. Thanks for your comment here — I’m super late in replying! Summer has been full of movement but we’ve landed in Lake Tahoe for a short while. More on that coming soon!

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  4. So good to hear how you’re doing, and *what* you’re doing. We did the underground river/cenote thing too – yes scary, but exhilarating! We spent 6 weeks at Playa but never got to Tulum. I think we decided that the more prominent Mayan ruins would be enough (Ek Balam, Chichen Itza, and a couple of others). So good to hear you’re loving it. Have you been to Akumal yet? You can swim with turtles there.
    I wouldn’t be at all surprised if there was a past life connection for you with the Mayan culture.
    I’m back from my travels and summer has finally landed here.
    Alison

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    1. Hello there! My apologies for replying so late to your comment on this post! Love your supportive thought about a possible past life connection to Mayan culture. So cool! Feels natural and explains a tiny detail of my life. I wish I knew more! 🙂

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    1. BRENDA! How are you??? So lovely to hear from you! How’s your summer? Thank you so much for reading my blog! Thank you for your comment! I’m sorry it’s taken so long to reply to you (and everyone else here). Summer has been very busy, as it is for all of us these days. And we’ve unexpectedly (but pleasantly) paused our travels and wanderings in Lake Tahoe for a few months. An unexpected opportunity came up to rent a cabin by the lake so we said YES. Loving every minute and looking forward to writing from this serene location. Hope you and Frank are doing great despite the smoke that is everywhere, including here. Thanks for getting in touch! More posts coming soon! xoxo, K.

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  5. I’m a friend of Patti’s who’s in the Yucatán now. Last year in Tulum I took a Spanish language immersion course and am back again to put it my year of study to practical use. I also jumped on a cenote or two, and agree they are a bit spooky!

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    1. Hey Denise! Are you still in the Yucatan? What’s your itinerary? Hope your Spanish skills are serving you well! It’s such a magnificent area. I would love to return someday. Hope you’ve had a great time there. Thanks for reading and getting in touch! We saw Patti last week here in Tahoe. We’re currently on the East Shore for the time being. ~Kelly

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  6. Love this, Kelly! Fifteen years ago I too was a different person. I have always appreciated ancient ruins, but I wasn’t as interested in history and culture as I am today. The Travesia Sagrada looks fascinating! It’s always heartening to see how people nowadays are embracing their long-lost cultures again, which are often packed with wisdom and virtues worth re-learning.

    Your description of the cenote swim reminded me of my experience crawling inside the tunnels used by the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War. It was certainly not the best place for claustrophobics.

    Can’t wait to hear where your adventure takes you next!

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    1. Bama! Thanks for your comment. I’m so sorry it’s taken so long to reply. It’s been a busy summer with a few surprises! Anyway — you will love exploring the Yucatan peninsula. Whenever you go, plan to spend plenty of time. There are so many ruins and cenotes and a lot of great food, too. I found a new appreciation for handmade tortillas and habanero peppers. Who knows, maybe we’ll meet up somewhere! We’re currently back in Lake Tahoe. As we were planning our fall/winter travel, an unexpected opportunity came up to live in a cabin at Lake Tahoe about 100 steps from the beach. We couldn’t pass it up — this just never happens here. We’re loving every minute and hoping this can be our new home base to hold on to and return to as we keep exploring the world. Come visit! Enjoy the weekend! ~K.

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      1. Kelly, that is amazing! Having the lake in your front yard gives you a lot more inspiration, doesn’t it? I hope by the time I get the chance to visit the US you’ll still be living in that corner of the country, and I’ll surely drop you a visit. Have a great Sunday to you too!

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  7. Great to read that you are embarking on a nomadic lifestyle. I have never been to Tulum but have meant many people that have and it always sounded rather alluring. Sad to read that the beaches are full of rotting algae, hopefully that is a temporary situation and not a permanent one. Also sad when places get too popular and then they grow so much that the original authenticity and charm get lost. Super interesting about the Mayan culture history and ruins.

    Peta

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  8. I loved exploring Tulum many years ago and your post brings back fond memories of swimming in cool green cenotes, eating tropical fruit on beaches no one knew about back then, and being able to wander all around ancient Mayan ruins which had yet to become tourist attractions. How much things have changed in the Yucatan Peninsula since then. I have such admiration for the way locals throughout Mexico have tried to hold onto their pre-Columbian roots while living in modernity. Now that the elections are over, it remains to be seen how the country progresses in the face of all its challenges. I hope you and your husband are enjoying the relocation.

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    1. Hey, BT. 🙂 Thanks for your comment. My apologies for taking so long to reply. Sounds like you were in Tulum before it was discovered by the rest of us! Dreamy! Love your point about locals holding on to their roots. Mexico has such rich culture and history, often eclipsed by the beach tourism that gets more attention. I’d love to return to the Yucatan and spend more time seeing the smaller sites and towns. Valladolid whet our appetite for more. We’re now in Lake Tahoe. An unexpected opportunity came up to live at the lake so we’ll be here for a few months while we figure out what’s next. Enjoy your weekend! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. How lovely to read this, and see photos of this place we went to five years ago. I had this incredible strong feeling in the ruins of Tulum and also Ek Balam that I had been thete/lived there at one time. Wonderful post.

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    1. Angel! Thanks for your comment, and sorry for such a late reply. It has been a busy summer with a couple pleasant surprises, including Lake Tahoe! More on that soon. Love that you had such a strong feeling of having lived at Tulum and Ek Balam. I wouldn’t be surprised given your affinity and love for the country and culture. Surely it comes from a deep place of familiarity and experience. Very cool to think about. Thanks for reading and great to hear from you!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Hi Kelly, Congrats on your new nomadic lifestyle. That’s Fantastic! 🙂 Years ago James and I did the same thing and it’s THE BEST thing we ever did. When people asked if we were “homeless” we said, “No, we’re home-free!” We simplified our lives, slashed our expenses, and wandered for years. And it looks like you’ve made a great start in Tulum. Your photos of the Maya ruins are gorgeous. I can’t wait to hear where you’ve decided to wander next. All the best, Terri

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    1. Terri, thanks so much for your comment! And I’m so sorry it’s taken so long to reply! I’ve been trying to catch up on my reading and writing today as you’ve probably noticed on a few posts of yours. I love your thoughts about home-free not homeless, and encouragement to wander the earth. Excellent advice! However… While setting out to do that beyond Tulum, we received an unexpected (once in a lifetime?) opportunity to rent a cabin (affordably) with a lake view and beach access at Lake Tahoe. What’s that saying? Life is what happens when you make other plans? Well life has changed the plan but we decided the situation was too good to pass up so we just said yes. We’ll be paused here for six months. Beyond that, we’re not sure but until then we’re enjoying every moment of this serene, beautiful spot. Hope you and James are doing well and loving life, as usual! And if you’re ever in the Tahoe neighborhood, please let me know!! Would love to spend some time with you both. ~K.

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