Monolith Mystery of Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

September 3rd, 2020

Here it is … Stonehenge. This is an interesting post to write because what can I add? With so much speculation, this wonder of world history may be better left to the imagination. Will we ever really know the origin, purpose or meaning of this anomaly in the English countryside? Certainly, it was significant to life and culture at the time it was assembled between 3000 and 1600 B.C., but its story has been lost to time in a world intolerant of the unknown.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Each of Stonehenge’s sarsen stones weighs approximately 25 tons and stands 13 feet/4 meters tall. The stones came from Marlborough, roughly 20 miles/32 km away. The smaller bluestones likely came from much farther away at Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire, about 155 miles/250 km from the site.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

How and why Stonehenge was constructed remains a mystery. Theories exist of course, both of this world and out of this world — wizards, aliens, celestial influences, ceremony or burial (human bone has been found on the site), or maybe a purpose related to the summer and winter solstices.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Exciting recent discoveries tell us more about the acoustic qualities of the site, made while testing a small-scale model called “Stonehenge Lego.” According to researchers, sound and reverberation would have been amplified within the site based on the shape and position of the stones.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge

Sitting in the grass viewing Stonehenge from afar and from various perspectives makes for a thought provoking afternoon. There are few things in life that have not disappeared or been forgotten after 5,000 years — Stonehenge is one of them. Human creativity is another.

More tomorrow from London!
Kelly

P.S. While you’re at Stonehenge, don’t miss seeing Salisbury Cathedral where you’ll also find one of only four copies of the Magna Carta, which dates back to 1215.

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral

Post of the Day: Adding a bit of light to the darkness as we get through the pandemic together. This series features travel photos from my archives, shared with you while staying close to home.

10 comments

  • I wonder if the truth will ever be discovered. Will Stonehenge still receive so many visitors, with the mystery gone?

    Liked by 1 person

  • A huge wonder really. While the vertical big stones are still understandable, I find it difficult to imagine how the horizontal ones were lifted to be placed up there. The egyptian pyramids are from same age roughly, but the stones were slightly smaller. And the regular shape allows use of tools like rollers and inclines to lift the stones in the pyramids. Also the presence of huge workforce for the pyramids.. But this … no proof of such engineering sophistication, how were the stones lifted then?

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  • Great post Kelly. As always I learnt a lot I didn’t know. Salisbury Cathedral is a jewel, particularly its glorious stained glass windows. Looking forward to my home town tomorrow 🙂

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  • Stonehenge is a mystery and a wonder — we both wondered about how those stones were transported. The demo at the back of the Visitor Center helped, but still . . . what a task!

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  • It’s so darn enigmatic! I go for the aliens theory myself. Your post brought back memories of my visit to Stonehenge in 1974. It was better in that there was no fence around it in those days and you could walk in amongst the stones. It was not so good because at that age (about 24) I was incapable of really seeing it, or taking in the import of it. It was kind of like looking at something out of a history lesson without any depth of understanding.
    Alison

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  • Stonehenge is a big enigma for me. I love the history and mystic of the place ever since I was a kid, but my friends who have visited have all said they were a bit disappointed (or a lot)… I think the unknown history is what fascinates. And I like how you add the Salisbury Cathedral, such a great contrast 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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  • Good evening ma’am,
    Thank you for this blog. It was precise and informative. Reading about architecture is very interesting but still in most of the online platforms, it becomes boring like reading out of a report. Your blog on the other hand, was interesting to read and I thank you for creating this write up.
    Eager to read more of your write ups ma’am,
    Have a nice day.

    Like

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