Revisiting Thaipusam, 2013

 

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

January 29th, 2021

With yesterday’s reverence, today we’re revisiting my post from 2013 about Thaipusam in Singapore, with updated and additional photos.

Depending on when you’re reading this, pour yourself a cup of coffee, tea or wine. This is a lengthy post of first impressions, explanations and historical background of an event I knew nothing about at the time. Looking back at these photos now, I have an enduring feeling of being welcomed into the ceremony throughout the day and night. I was never chased off or turned away. At times, participants looked me straight in the eye — not to stare at me but to show me what was within them.

Part two from 2014 follows tomorrow.

Until then,
Kelly

Post of the Day: Adding a bit of light to the darkness as we get through the pandemic together. This series features travel photos from my archives, shared with you while staying close to home.

***

I am entirely new to the complex world of Hindu faith and deities, so explaining Thaipusam and the events of Sunday feels a bit like cramming hundreds of years of history into one comparatively minute composition. Impossible. I’ve been going at it for nearly two days – writing, researching, deleting, rewriting and here I am again revisiting the introduction.

I went to Thaipusam Saturday and Sunday — four times, to four locations. Admittedly, I was a little obsessed even though I knew very little about the occasion. I had no idea what to expect, and in hindsight this may have been to my benefit. I scratched the surface, it whet my appetite, I went back for more, and more again, and then walked away – my head filled with images, blossoming questions and the gratitude of having experienced a unique day in world culture.

I started by venturing to Little India on Saturday afternoon, expecting to find a frenzy of Thaipusam preparation. What I found instead was an unusually quiet neighborhood with the last remaining silver pots, peacock feathers, coconuts and fruit for sale.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Early Sunday morning (1:00 a.m.) I went to the Thaipusam route expecting to see a parade in full regalia. What I saw instead was the modest beginning of Thaipusam’s 24-hour procession, with men and women carrying pots on their heads striding forward in the dark .

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Later Sunday morning (7:00 a.m.) I went to Serangoon road expecting to watch the same type of procession from the roadside barriers, but things had started to change. The elaborate vel and chariot kavadis of Thaipusam were beginning to emerge from the Sri Srinivasa Perumal temple, carried slowly down the street. I watched for an hour and then decided to go to the heart of it, to the point from which it was all flowing.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

I entered the temple, filled with people in total devotion to their faith who tolerated, and even welcomed, my curiosity as I wandered around and watched for several hours as they prepared their kavadis. The intensity of the atmosphere was palpable. A stimulating cacophony of drumming and chanting never ceased. When I finally left the temple the comparative silence outside allowed my senses to rest, revealing a bit of mental exhaustion from the whole experience. Sunday afternoon (3:00 p.m.) I went back one last time to the end of the route, this time with no expectations of what I would find. A nearly impenetrable mass of people surrounded the Sri Thendayuthapani temple where people were completing their journeys and disassembling their kavadis at a designated area outside. I didn’t go into the temple. Having seen so many astonishing things in one day, I decided to save the end for another year and went home.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

As a foreigner in Southeast Asia, it’s always enlightening to compare my North American expectations with the realities of events like Thaipusam. I had expected the end of the procession to be the highlight. I thought my access to the temple would be limited as a non-Hindu. I expected that Thaipusam’s hooks and spikes would be gruesome to see. I was wrong by all accounts. It’s so humbling and invigorating to feel like such a beginner, such a student of an entire region of the world.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

When I returned home I began researching the details of everything I saw. What I’ve learned since Saturday are some important aspects of Thaipusam that answer some of the questions looming in my mind and my photos. Why milk? Why peacock feathers? Why all the piercing of the skin? Why the shouting and drumming? Where on earth did all of this begin? Let’s just say… it’s complicated. There’s no way I can possibly understand all the intricacies of Thaipusam in three days (particularly since important figures in Hinduism have multiple names and spellings), but I do think I know enough now to (finger) paint a picture for anyone who cares to read on. Let’s start with language.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

The Dravidian language family includes 85 languages spoken by 250 million people. Dravidian languages are, very possibly, native to India. Tamil is a language of the Dravidian family, spoken primarily in southern India and northern Sri Lanka. Tamil is distinguished as one of the longest surviving classical languages in the world, with literature dating back more than 2,000 years. It is from Tamil-speaking Hindu communities that Thaipusam originated. In addition to India and Sri Lanka, other countries including Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Myanmar have large Tamil-speaking populations who annually observe Thaipusam.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam begins at midnight on the day of the full moon of the first month of the Vedic, or ancient Hindu, calendar. Thai is the Tamil name for this month and Pusam is the associated ascending constellation. Formed by three stars, Vedic followers described the constellation’s shape as the udder of a cow, from which milk flows. The name Pusam describes this image as “nourisher,” so milk is poured, carried in metal pots and offered throughout the events of Thaipusam.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Metaphorically, Thaipusam is known as the Day of Light. It was on the full moon of the first month that Tamil saint Swami Ramalinga ascended from his physical body and merged with the light of Lord Shiva, disappearing from earth in the process. It was also on the full moon of the first month that Hindu deity Murugan (Tamil Light of Lights, god of war, leader of the Devas or supernatural deities) conquered the Asuras, generally symbolic of bad forces and chaos. Murugan was son of Lord Shiva and the goddess Parvati. His mount was a peacock, the most beautiful of birds, large and balanced on two small feet. He fought the Asuras with twelve weapons given to him by his parents. Lord Shiva provided him with eleven and Parvati provided him with the twelfth: a vel, also known as a lance or a spear. It was with this vel that Murugan achieved victory over the Asuras, which is the reason why vels are so highly symbolic in the rituals of Thaipusam.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

A person taking part in Thaipusam often has a request for Murugan, as a provider of favors. The request most likely concerns an obstacle or challenge in life, or a desire for spiritual development. The requester carries a kavadi, symbolic of a burden or “sacrifice at every step,” and offers it to Murugan in exchange for divine assistance with his or her request. The kavadi may be small like a pot of milk or large like a metal canopy resting on the shoulders with vels attached to the skin. In whatever form, the kavadi must be carried or pulled by bare feet along a designated route. In Singapore the route is four kilometers from Sri Srinivasa temple in Little India to Sri Thendayuthapani temple near River Valley Road.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

For the days leading up to Thaipusam, kavadi bearers eat once a day, take a vow of celibacy, refrain from smoking and alcohol, and dwell in the thought of Murugan. On Thaipusam they dress in shades of orange and yellow and are marked on their skin with holy ash. They conduct elaborate prayer rituals and slice or shatter coconuts as symbols of the obstacles they hope to overcome. When the preparations are complete, the kavadis are assembled.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

For a person bearing a vel kavadi, assembling it at the beginning of the route is a long, literally painstaking process. Friends and relatives begin building the structure by anchoring it to his body, either with a belt or by use of steel posts inserted through the skin at four points around his waist. The posts are attached to shoulder pads to provide comfort and stability. The canopy – often several feet tall, symbolic of a mountain and decorated with peacock feathers in honor of Murugan – is mounted on the posts, and has a radius of three to four feet from the torso. Thin vels, with sharp ends or hooks, are threaded through holes in the canopy and attached to the body by piercing the skin. Family and friends yell and chant at the kavadi bearers as piercings take place, distracting them from the pain. Some have entire drum teams that provide intoxicating, relentless rhythm that, even for a spectator, amplifies the atmosphere away from pain into a spiritual realm.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

With the canopy assembled, the kavadi bearer may take on one or two more vels through the cheeks and/or tongue, rendering him speechless in a vow of silence, or mouna. Surprisingly, there is no blood. Holy ash at the site of the piercings, along with fasting and meditation, stems the flow. With the final vels in place, the kavadi bearer dances and spins with the drumming, then leaves the temple and walks the route.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

This entire process happens continually throughout the night and day as groups assemble kavadis and depart the temple in their own time. Kavadis vary greatly in their size and format. Some men hang limes from hooks in their torsos as a way to ward off evil spirits. Others hang dozens of small milk pots from their backs or carry a wooden pole on their shoulders with milk pots hanging from the ends, pouring the milk over a statue of Murugan at the end of the journey. The choices and combinations are unique, fascinating and clearly very personal.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

Experiencing Thaipusam is a rare and special opportunity – one to seize if the time and location present themselves. What I expected to be gruesome turned out to be incredibly reverent, requiring total focus and dedication. I found Singapore’s Tamil community peaceful, welcoming and respectful of me as an outsider looking into their world. May my words and my photos exist as my gratitude, in honor of the very memorable day they shared with me.

Thaipusam, 2013

Thaipusam, 2013

9 comments

  • It’s a great report of the celebration with the complementary research that allows for a better understanding. I really like these explanations, beyond the strangeness, there is a reason. I am impressed by these faithful people who behave so differently from the ordinary daily practices to follow the customs of their faith. In addition to the religious aspect, there must also be the need to express the belonging to a community that differentiates from others with these customs. Great thanks for you work and for taking us so far.

    Liked by 1 person

  • It must have been an amazing experience, Kelly, but not one I would wish to get this close to. Faith is a strange thing! 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • Once again I have learnt so much from visiting compassandcamera Kelly. A memorable post that reveals what a special place the blogosphere can be for those of us lucky enough to spend time with you. Thank you 💕

    Like

  • You are a true student of the world, Kelly, and I admire that so much about you. From your unabashed attendance at events like this to your serious research afterward, you have invested in your own worldly education and then gone the extra step of carrying that experience and learning to us, your readers, through illuminating and enlightening posts like this. As one of those faithful readers, I thank you!

    Like

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  • Oh this is just stunning. I know it’s something I’d love to witness. Your photographs are exceptional, and deeply evocative, and your descriptions took me right there. Thank you.
    Alison

    Like

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